Your First Colitis Attack – What To Look Out For

First of all, don’t panic. Don’t immediately start to worry about the future and what this will mean for your life. Yes your life will change but probably not to the exaggerated extent that your racing mind is suggesting.

The symptoms that you maybe suffering from could well not be colitis. Don’t get inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS) mixed up with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). With IBS, you will experience a mild version of IBD. Yes you may have some discomfort in your bowel when going to the toilet and you will probably have some very small evidence of passing blood. You must go to your doctor for colitis (IBD) to be discounted and if they give you the all clear then quite simply celebrate. Why did I just say this? Well, you have been spared the difficult journey that more people each year have to endure when they are diagnosed with colitis.

So what should you look out for as the early signs of colitis? You may notice a slight discomfort in your lower abdominal area. It can be brought about by the movement of walking. Normally, for example when an infection begins you feel its strength slowly building up. You are aware of its gradual influence over your body’s health and how it influences then takes control over it. It is normally gradual. Colitis can often be very different. From very mild symptoms, such as the burning sensation in the abdominal area, to the onset of diarrhoea, things can start to change very quickly.

Colitis is no respect of time, whatever is going on in your life, you can’t just take a tablet or two to delay the symptoms. If you are going to get a colitis attack, it is going to happen no matter how you may wish to delay it or think “I will be okay to keep going for another week before it hits me” to the point where you will have to slow down and stop what you are doing. Furthermore, don’t think that you can fall back on the dangerous assumption that it will “just go away” if you leave it. Ulceration of the colon is serious and once it occurs, it certainly does not “just go away”. If someone took this stance, they would be storing up a lot of trouble and discomfort for themselves.

If colitis is not treated with the required medication, the ulceration of the colon will go unchecked. The bleeding will intensify and coupled with an increase in the need to go to the toilet and the resultant pain, the sufferer will inevitably be faced with the no choice scenario of going to their doctor for a diagnosis and then undergoing treatment. Unfortunately, the patient might have endured a longer period of greater discomfort that could have been reduced had assist been asked for sooner. At this time, it is also important to seek the experience and knowledge of others who have experienced exactly what it is like to live through their first colitis attack and learned how to live life as normal as possible with ulcerative colitis. Little pieces of advice really can make a big difference. Get them now at The Colitis Experience

 





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